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Help in your home and community

Staying independent is the best way to stay healthy whether you have care needs, a disability or need support into older age.

It is important that you can continue to lead an active and fulfilling lifestyle, while remaining safe and secure in your own home, whatever your care needs are. Having access to the right local services, support, equipment and technology when you need them can help you to achieve this.

What is assistive technology and how can it help me?

Assistive technology (also known as telecare) is a range of equipment and services that support your safety and independence in your own home.

Carecall
The council’s personal alarm service, Carecall, can help you to live independently at home. It ensures people can get help as quickly as possible in case of an emergency. By pressing a button (worn as a pendant or on your wrist) you can trigger an alarm that will contact the Carecall control centre 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Carecall alarms can cost as little as £3.50 per week.

You can contact Carecall directly to request an alarm on 01925 458000 or by email ccontrolcentre@warrington.gov.uk.

Telecare
Telecare is a range of equipment and services that support your safety and independence in your own home. The equipment can sense risks such as smoke, floods and gas leaks, can remind you to take pills and even call for help if you fall. You can view a range of telecare equipment locally at the Centre for Independent Living.  For independent advice on telecare, see the WHICH? Guide to telecare services.  

If you need more information, a number of local services and suppliers of assistive technology are available.

What is care in your own home?

Care in your own home
Remaining in your own home can be difficult if you have additional needs, you are getting older, or you've found yourself at home after an unexpected illness or accident.

Home care, sometimes called domiciliary care, is when care workers come into your home to help you with agreed tasks. This may be things like help with taking medication, washing, bathing, dressing, toileting needs, cleaning, tidying, cooking and shopping - different agencies offer different services.

All home care providers are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). The CQC is a national organisation that inspects and monitors care service providers. You can view all registered care providers’ inspection reports on the CQC website.  

If you think you need help with care in your own home, you can arrange services yourself. However, if you have eligible care and support needs you can ask for an assessment by a social care worker, who may be able to plan and arrange services on your behalf. A social worker will also be able to suggest ways to reduce or delay your need for care and support services. Please contact Warrington Borough Council’s Adult Social Care First Response team to discuss or arrange an assessment.

Find different home care providers and their contact details

Find out how much you may have to pay
Our online calculator can help you to find out how much you may need to pay towards your care based on your income, savings and expenses.

I’m self funding
If you have savings of £23,350 you will be asked to pay the full cost of any services you use. This is known as being a ‘self-funder’. See the NHS guide to paying for your own care and support.

Can I get council funding?
Yes, but Warrington Borough Council's adult social services will need to carry out a social care assessment and a financial assessment.

We can then tell you how the council will work out what you need to pay, and how it will affect your income, savings and property.

If you have savings over £23,250, the council will not be able to contribute financially towards your care and you will need to pay for this yourself.

Further Information:
Care Choices - Care in your own home
Which? - What is domiciliary care?
Age UK - How to find the help you need at home
NHS Choices – Homecare: what’s available
Which? – Questions to ask a home care agency

What home adaptations and equipment are available to me?

There is a range of equipment available and adaptations to your home which can be made, to help you remain in your own home.

Equipment to assist with daily living
Equipment to assist with daily activities can be any piece of equipment which will help to maintain your independence and promote your wellbeing. There are items of equipment available to assist with things like bathing, cooking and getting around both indoors and outside.

Minor adaptations
Minor adaptations are physical changes to your home which cost less than £1,000. They can include things like grab rails, half steps, lever taps and more.

Major adaptations
If, because of a medical condition or physical disability, you are having difficulty getting in and out of your home, or you are having trouble getting to and from essential facilities such as your bedroom or bathroom, a major adaptation may help you to remain independent and safe at home.  For example:

  • Fitting a ramp, if you are a wheelchair user, to enable you to get in and out of your home
  • Fitting a stair lift, if you aren’t able to manage the stairs, so that you can get to your bedroom and bathroom.
  • Adapting your home so you only need to live downstairs  
  • Adapting your bathroom or kitchen to enable you to use these safely and as independently as possible

Other equipment suppliers
A lot of equipment is widely available both on the high street and online (e.g. Amazon, Argos, B&Q or local chemist shops) or in specialist shops (e.g. Miller Care). The Centre for Independent Living (CIL) in Warrington also provides advice and supplies equipment that you can try before buying.  

Disabled Facilities Grants
You may be eligible for a Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) if you’re disabled and you need to make changes to your home to help you live independently. Grants are means tested and therefore targeted at people on low incomes. Find out more about Disabled Facilities Grants, the application process, low cost loans, adaptations loan and relocation loans here.

If you need more information, a number of local services and suppliers of equipment and technology are available.

Can I have help with home and garden maintenance?

Home maintenance
You may need access to a range of trades-people including plumbers, joiners, roofers, builders, gas engineers, plasterers, locksmiths, window fitters, electricians, and painters and decorators.

Warrington Home Improvement Agency
Warrington Home Improvement Agency can provide minor adjustments, repairs or improvements to make homes safe and secure. They can also provide the provision of a Handyperson to complete health and safety related repairs and to supply and fit minor adaptations. This service is for elderly, disabled or vulnerable people, and families on low incomes who own their own homes or live in private rented accommodation and wish to repair, improve or adapt their homes.

Gardening services
Do you find it difficult to keep on top of gardening chores? If so, there are many services which can offer:

  • Grass cutting
  • Tree surgery and felling
  • Hedge trimming
  • Fencing

Find home and garden maintenance services.

Can I have help with meal preparation and delivery?

Meal preparation and delivery
If you are havening difficulty making your own meals at home, you can have meals delivered or pay for help with meal preparation.

  • Delivered frozen meals – there are services which will deliver to your door and unpack frozen ready meals and desserts.
  • Supermarket frozen and fresh meals – supermarkets will deliver frozen ready meals, fresh ready meals, groceries and other products. A delivery charge and minimum order delivery will apply for supermarkets.
  • Assistance with shopping / shopping deliver services – there are services that can assist you with your shopping if you are able to prepare your own meals but are unable to go to the shop.
  • Assistance with meal preparation – you could think about getting a carer who can visit you at home. They can help with cooking, shopping, tidying and cleaning.

Find meal preparation and delivery services.

In the kitchen – home adaptations and equipment
Depending on what difficulties you are having, you might find that there is equipment that can help you with tasks in the kitchen. For example:

  • If you find lifting pans difficult, then it may be worth buying smaller versions or using a cooking basket (like the baskets in chip pans) so you don't have to lift a heavy pan of boiling water.
  • A small jug / travel kettle may be easier to manage than a full size kettle.
  • Cutlery with larger / padded handles can be easier to hold and control if you have difficulties with your hands and grip.
  • Spreader boards, vegetable preparation stations, cutlery and can openers are available that you can use with one hand.
  • You can rest on a perching stool while preparing food, cooking or washing up so you don’t have to stand all the time, this can make kitchen jobs less tiring.
  • A ’helping hand’ or grab stick can be useful to assist with reaching higher or lower cupboards, etc. This reduces the need to bend or reach and can therefore reduce the risk of falls.


Equipment to help with managing day to day tasks is now much more widely available both on the high street (e.g. Argos, B&Q or local chemists) and in specialist shops (e.g. Millercare). The Centre for Independent Living (CIL) in Warrington also provides advice and supply equipment that you can try before buying.

Can I get help with personal care and hygiene?

Personal care is a broad term used to refer to supporting with personal hygiene and toileting needs, along with dressing and maintaining your personal appearance.

You could get help with personal care when you access home care (sometimes called domiciliary care), where care workers come into your home to help you with agreed tasks.

It can cover, but is not limited to:

  • Bathing and showering, including bed-baths
  • Applying lotions and creams as required
  • Dressing and getting ready for bed
  • Oral hygiene
  • Hair care
  • Support with shaving
  • Helping you to the toilet, including use a commode or bed pan
  • Changing continence pages, along with cleaning intimate areas
  • Support moving position in bed, to stretch and prevent bed sores
  • Changing or maintaining a stoma or catheter bag, or other forms of clinical intervention

All organizations which provide personal care are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). The CQC is a national organisation that inspects and monitors care service providers. You can view all registered care providers’ inspection reports on the CQC website. 

If you think you need help with personal care and hygiene, you can arrange services yourself. However, if you have eligible care and support needs, you can ask for an assessment by a social care worker, who may be able to plan and arrange services on your behalf. A social worker may also be able to suggest ways to reduce or delay your need for long-term care and support services. Please contact Warrington Borough Council’s Adult Social Care First Response team to discuss or arrange an assessment.

Find different personal care home care providers and their contact details

Can I get help with caring for my pet?

You must make sure that any animal you own or care for:

  • Has a proper diet and fresh water
  • Has somewhere suitable to live
  • Is kept with or away from other animals, depending on its needs
  • Is allowed to express itself and behave normally
  • Is protected from, and treated for, illness and injury.

There are services and volunteers available who will help owners and assist with dog walking, vet trips, cleaning litter trays and generally giving peace of mind regarding the care of their pet.

There are also services available that will arrange short term foster care of pets when an owner has to go into hospital, and services that work to keep elderly owners and those in final stages of a terminal illness together with their pet.

Find pet related services.

What daytime activities are available?

Remaining socially active and taking part in activities that you enjoy are a good way to stay healthy whether you have care needs, a disability or need support into older age. There are a range of services that can help you to get out and about and be part of your local community.

Find further information on the different types of daytime activities available.

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